School in Action

Middle School / Love Hate/Curriculum Vitae performance on Monday, November 6 at 7pm

The seventh graders are creating poetic lists of their loves and hates and the eighth graders are crafting their curricula vitae, their resume for life.  They will be reciting these lovely and insightful pieces on Monday evening November 6 beginning at 7pm in the Arts Barn Theater. The recitation of these poems of identity is always fascinating, humorous, moving, and revealing.

October 12, 2017 6:30 – 8:00 pm, Montessori Outcomes, Discussion with HMS Alumni

High School students, college students and young professionals who attended Hilltop Montessori School, for middle school or starting in pre-school, return to share their Hilltop experiences. How did their education at HMS prepare them for their subsequent education and for life? Parents of our current students as well as prospective parents are encouraged to attend this event. Faculty will also be in attendance.

Free Play by Amelia Fontein, Lower Elementary Assistant

Let the children be free; encourage them; let them run outside when it is raining; let them remove their shoes when they find a puddle of water; and, when the grass of the meadows is damp with dew, let them run on it and trample it with their bare feet; let them rest peacefully when a tree invites them to sleep beneath it’s shade; let them shout and laugh when the sun wakes them in the morning as it wakes every living creature that divides its day between waking and sleeping” ~ Maria Montessori

If you travel to Hilltop Montessori School around noon on a weekday, you might be surprised to hear chatter and laughter coming from the forest adjacent to the parking lot. Walk the short dirt path into the woods, and you’ll encounter children darting among the trees, building forts from bark and fallen branches, collecting fistfuls of acorns and pinecones, and creating a magical world of their own making. This environment offers lessons that are just as valuable as those taught inside our classrooms. Just as our morning classroom work cycle gives students the freedom to choose the “work” that they are developmentally ready for, our Elementary recess and after school time lets children choose any activities from fantasy play in the woods to developing their skateboarding skills.

In the increasingly structured and technological world in which we live, it is of utmost importance to provide children with unstructured play time in the natural world. At Hilltop, Elementary Recess and After Care are both designed to offer this time for children to engage in imaginative, free play within a safe, supervised environment – often in “Haytown”. The name “Haytown” has been around for years! Originally children collected cut grass from the freshly mowed fields and used that as their currency.

For our elementary students, social-emotional learning is a component of free play that we support during Recess and After Care. Children are constantly driven to resolve conflict with peers, collaborate on long-term projects, negotiate around shared resources, and make decisions to reach their own goals. We repeatedly see children devising compromises to divvy up bricks, logs, acorns, etc., working in a group for weeks at a time on elaborate forest dwellings, and learning to navigate the socially tricky ins and outs of running a Haytown business. Outside of Haytown, we often observe groups of students working together to develop rules and guidelines for games like Four Square, Capture the Flag, and Monkey Bar Tag.

Another enormous benefit of unstructured play is physical fitness and dexterity. Practicing pull ups on the monkey bars, lugging logs through Haytown to build a fort, learning how to ride a unicycle, balancing on a fallen log in the woods; these activities allow children to build their strength and coordination through play.

Finally, playing in the natural world allows children to expand their sense of wonder, creativity, and imagination. The economy within Haytown is living testament. Children open restaurants, antique shops, insurance agencies, newspaper publishers, general stores, arcades, and drive throughs. Customers looking to buy goods or services can use quartz stones, known as “crystals”, to make their purchases. Children are continuously dreaming up original business schemes, finding new uses for old materials, and using their imaginations to create a true culture and community within Haytown. This is a genuine joy to observe.

So, next time you pick up your child take a moment to observe some of the amazing structures that have been built and the learning that’s occurring during that unstructured time. As Maria Montessori reminds us: “Play is the work of the child.”

Middle School Performance “Unclaimed” Monday 5/8 & Tuesday 5/9 at 7PM

The Middle School is busy writing and rehearsing its annual performance. The newly titled show, “Unclaimed”, is a dramatic miracle that has taken shape. The creation of this show is like a bit of alchemy. The musings of individuals, small groups of collaborators, and full class brain storming stirs the pot and eventually turns to gold.  Ultimately, the performance is the vehicle we use to process our experiences in Alabama and the year’s work in exploring the evolution of the American identity. Always fascinating, powerful, tuneful, funny, and moving! The Middle School performances are Monday, May 8 at 7:00pm (with a festive reception afterwards!) and Tuesday, May 9 at 7:00pm in the Arts Barn Theater. There will also be a school show on Tuesday morning at 10:00am. We hope to see you there!

Middle School Alabama Odyssey 2017 Day 7

Day 7 – Tuesday

Pack and leave Healing Waters and Selma

Day in Montgomery

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Southern Poverty Law Center

Lunch – Filet and Vine

Equal Justice Initiative

Alabama Statehouse/Confederate Memorial/Speeches

Fried Tomato Buffet

Sleep – Hargis

Today we went to a place like no other. Dexter Avenue [Baptist Church] was a place that had lots of spirit and I could feel the energy that Dr. King left there.   -Henry

The Southern Poverty Law Center opened my eyes to all the hate in the USA. Touching Emmitt Till’s name was like touching him and telling him I was going to make his death mean something. It was then, touching his name and tracing the letters, that this whole trip, every moment and every person, became true, real, honest, moments in time.   -Eliot

Thinking about what the Equal Justice Initiative guys said about using your passion to help others — I’ve actually thought about that a lot before, how whatever I decide I’d like to do, I should use it to help those who are hurt by this society.    -Leah

Our time with Evan and Luke (at the EJI) was a discussion between people who clearly had so much respect for each other. We talked together no at each other. The stories of death row and child imprisonment that continue today was the first time on this trip where I truly and deeply felt inspired to find my passion and work with it to create positive change just like these men had.    -Lucy F.

[The EJI] had this exhibit that almost brought tears to my eyes. It showed the soil from where different lynchings took place. I imagined holding the grains of people’s identity in my hands as they slowly passed through my fingers… I gave my speech today and felt like I put my whole heart into it. I closed my eyes and imagined James Baldwin’s eyes twinkling as he smiles.”    -Lily C.

I was happy to be able to preform my speech by the dirt of the lynchings. It was so powerful to stand in front of part of what Ida B. Wells devoted her life to… I hope to keep Ida B. Wells’ spirit close. I would love to strive to be like her. She was so strong and courageous.  -Nomi

EJI really made me think about two things. First about children having their lives stripped from them and then how can I use my passions to relate to fighting for civil rights. I couldn’t ever imagine being taken away from my life and sent to prison for something I did as a teenager.   -Lily B.

I loved how they (Evan and Luke from EJI) spoke about using your passions to help the cause. I spent some of this time planning out my entire future and how I can contribute to inmates in need of medical attention… Such an amazing last day in the glorious state of Alabama!     -Marley

I will never physically be in Alabama again but my mind will. Today was our last full day in Alabama. Alabama taught me so many things and changed my perspective on the world outside of VT.   -Owen

The reason I loved this trip was just because we got to live what we had been studying for so long.   -Sam

 

Middle School Alabama Odyssey 2017 Day 6

Day 6 – Monday

Meet Sheryl Threadgill and other participants of the voting rights movement in Wilcox County at the historic Antioch Baptist Church.

Miss Kitty’s Restaurant in Camden for lunch,

Shoe Store Museum,

Black Belt Treasures – a gallery of over 400 artists from all over the Blackbelt

Conversation and dinner with the BAMA Kids

 

Our visit at the [Antioch Baptist] church in the morning was a really warm experience. Their stories were amazing to hear. -Hayden

As we raised our voices and sang Carry It On, you could feel the powerful presence of history. -Lily C.

[In the Shoe Store Museum] I was really struck by these handmade blankets that it said were made by a slave named Emmy in the 1800s. My name just seems like such a big part of who I am. Imagining a girl with my same name but with a completely different life was really powerful for me. -Emmy

I felt that we had hopped through the floorboards of someone’s attic and was just looking through their history. It also had the same smell. -Henry

Betty Anderson told us this incredible story about how Sheriff Lummie Jenkins stood in front of the courthouse and said, “I will die and go to Hell before I let a n**** vote.” And the minute the words left his lips, he dropped dead. Betty’s grandmother stepped over his body and in to register. -Tula

At BAMA Kids for the first time I felt white, really white. -Mason

We have been so lucky to go places we are welcome. Today I think we got a taste of what it was like to not be completely wanted by the BAMA kids. It felt like we were kinda being mocked for our whiteness. -Nomi

I could not tell if the divide between us was caused because we were [mostly] privileged white kids, or ‘cause we were just outsiders. I wonder how we would feel if a bunch of black kids came to Vermont knowing a whole lot about syrup, such a usual and interesting thing to us. How would we feel? -Huxley

Middle School Alabama Odyssey 2017 Day 5

Day 5 – Sunday

Church service at Ye Shall Know the Truth Baptist Church

Picnic with Mary Lee Bendolph and the folks of Gee’s Bend.

Afternoon – Dr. Bernard Lafayette

Evening – Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Boynton

I rarely go to church and it’s usually on Christmas Eve. The atmosphere in this church was so different from the ones that I have been to with my family. The singing especially was really different. They seem to have so much more energy and it was really powerful to see and be a part of.   -Emmy

Being with the people of Gees Bend was like being with people you already knew.    -Riley

Mary Lee Bendolph (from Gees Bend) was like the nicest woman I ever met.   -Van

(Editor’s note: Today we discovered Van’s natural talent for quilting. Get that boy some sewing needles!)

Dr. Lafayette’s stories were amazing and he and his wife were so friendly. It’s hard to comprehend that of everything he endured in his career, the scariest thing was riding a horse. He was very funny, too. Afterward, I got his autograph and he wrote “To Leah, the future is in your hands.” Then I asked him if he had known Septima Clark from the SCLC and he did!!! I am so happy. Estatic, even.

-Leah

Dr. Lafayette: freedom fighting, snake holding, AK-47 swallowing, horse fearing, badass.    -Mason

Hearing Lafayette’s story showed me that even the small contributions you make toward equality are worth it.   -Huxley

Just thinking about how incredibly courageous [Dr. Lafeyette] was. Until now I don’t think I’ve grasped how crazy powerful nonviolence is. He protected a man that beat him, pointed a gun, and planned for his murder. I would never have the intense dedication, power, patience, and courage to do that now but I hope someday that I will.

[Dr. Lafayette] started talking about fear and how sometimes you find yourself in situations and have to stand up even if you don’t know the consequences.    -Zoe

 

Middle School Alabama Odyssey 2017 Day 4

Day 4 – Saturday

Journeys for the Soul with Joanne Bland

Brown’s Chapel – Cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge

Charlie Lucas – “Tin Man” Artist

Surprise meeting with Afriye We-Kanduthis

Dinner at Healing Waters Retreat Center

Talk with State Senator Sanders

[Joanne Bland’s] passion for history and her passion for spreading seeds for the future was evident in every move. When I held the stone that John Lewis stood on, when I felt the power of the place we were standing, felt the power of history channeled through Ms. Bland, I knew I had to make my change, fulfill my piece in the jigsaw puzzle. -Julia

As we sat in the pews [of Brown Chapel] all I could think about was Shea or Rachel [from Selma, Lord, Selma] or Dr. King may have sat here. As we made our way from the church and looking at the I Have a Dream monument made me think of how invested Sophie was in changing it. -Nomi

When we pulled up to Brown Chapel the first thing I saw was that the memorial said, “I have a dream,” and that just gave me so much hope that I even might have had some part in changing that made me feel like I can really help and change what I think is wrong in the world. -Lily B

Charlie Lucas’ art was really beautiful. I love most of all when he said, “Make something every day,” because it spoke so beautifully of how important it is to never stop at what you can do. Always strive one step further. -Tula

I had a really fun time playing drums with all those people. I like the way they got everyone to join in in some way by playing or just clapping. I thought the one chant that Afriye was doing was super cool. The way it sounded was really satisfying. -Daniel


I didn’t really like going to the drumming place, but I think Afriye said one of the most powerful things I heard all trip. She said not to be blind to color, because we should be conscious of race, but not to base our decisions and opinions on it. -Hayden

I can’t really sum this day up in a sentence, but then again you can’t sum our history as a nation up in a sentence. That’s what today was: a day with love, hate, compassion, forgiveness, community, and unity. For me the most inspire minutes of the day were spent with Ms. Bland in the graveyard. It is a magical place right there in the center of community between the graves of those who built this nation and those who may have worked to take it down. The moss grew off the trees, long, twisted, soft, and overtaking. The moment that I experienced is honestly a very lucky one, and one that I will remind myself over and over not to forget. Not to forget that we are the most powerful force in our sacred world. -Alex