All posts by admHillMo

Stone Soup, Tuesday, November 25

Stone soup 2014The entire student body and faculty will join forces on Tuesday the 25th to prepare Stone Soup. Peace Buddies work together to cut vegetables, make cornbread, decorations and apple crisp. We always read the story of Stone Soup and reflect on its messages of sharing and graciousness. Then, we sit together and share in the fall harvest as one big family. We also take this time to celebrate the soups made by Middle School students throughout the year and encourage everyone to bring in non-perishable foods for a local food pantry.

2014 Fall Grandparents’ and Special Friends’ Day

child with grandmotherWe welcome Grandparents and Special Friends to our campus on Monday, November 24th for Grandparents’ and Special Friends’ Day. This is a wonderful opportunity for children to share their enthusiasm for their work with loved ones. Coffee and baked goods will be served at 8:30AM in the Arts Barn lobby followed by a brief welcome from Head of School, Tamara Mount. Then guests will be escorted to the classrooms where they will spend some time one on one with their grandchild(ren) or special friend(s). At 10:30 we will come together in the theater for All School Gathering after which students will say goodbye. For more information email Amelia Farnum, afarnum@hilltopmontessori.org.

“Of Bread and Paper” One Man Puppet Show Benefit at Hilltop Montessori School

Saturday, November 22 at 5pm, in the Arts Barn, Hilltop Montessori is thrilled to present one of its own – Middle School Teacher and Artist, Finn Campman as he stages his one man puppet show entitled “Of Bread and Paper”. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children. There  is limited seating so reservations are required. Sign up a the front desk, or email Amelia at afarnum@hilltopmontessori.org. All proceeds are to benefit Hilltop’s 2014 Annual Fund.

Of Bread and Paper

This evocative piece, which played to sold-out audiences at the 2012 Puppets in the Green Mountains festival, invites you to enter a world of light and shadow where layers of meaning are glimpsed and gradually revealed.  Of Bread and Paper is the story of a poor refugee trying to find his way home. His exile is self imposed but enforced by the struggles of the world: poverty, conflict, indecision, and love. The show is played with paper figures, light and shadows and is appropriate for children 7 and up.

Bet you didn’t know…

Finn Campman studied printmaking and literature at Sarah Lawrence College, and began working with puppets in 1991 when he joined Sandglass Theater. Since then, he has worked with Roman Paska at the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center, taught puppet construction and design at Helsinki College of Art and Design and in residence at Hamilton College. He taught puppet and object manipulation for six summers at Sandglass Theater’s Summer Intensive. Finn is Co-Artistic director of Company of Strangers, whose production Moth and Moon won an UNIMA Citation of Excellence. He has toured Scandinavia, Portugal, Hungary, Germany, France, Spain, and Israel. Finn Co-directed and Designed Touchstone Theatre’s production of The Little Prince, and was guest video artist and composer in a collaboration with Contemporary Dance Wyoming. For four years he was an Artist in Residence at The Hall Farm Center for the Arts and Education. Finn created the video component for the Brattleboro Music Center’s production of Devine Chemistry, and has presented his work in two Puppetry In The Green Mountain Festivals.

 

Let’s Grow Kids

By Tamara Mount, November 14, 2014           

Time and time again, Dr. Maria Montessori’s ideas from 100 years ago are proven by modern science. Hilltop has been participating in the state-wide campaign, Let’s Grow Kids (http://www.letsgrowkids.org/), a public education campaign to raise the awareness of the importance of the early years in development. This campaign is to make Vermonters aware of facts that Maria Montessori noted in her early writings, “The most important period of life is not the age of university studies, but the first one, the period from birth to the age of six.  For that is the time when man’s intelligence itself, his greatest implement is being formed.  But not only his intelligence; the full totality of his psychic powers. At no other ages has the child greater need of an intelligent help, and any obstacle that impedes his creative work will lessen the chance he has of achieving perfection.”

Or, as Let’s Grow Kids puts it, “Eighty percent of a child’s brain is developed by age three and 90% is developed by age five.” And, “Getting kids ready for school means more than helping them with their ABCs, packing their lunch boxes, filling their backpacks, and getting them to the bus on time. It starts the day they’re born with quality early experiences.” Montessorian’s have known it all along – the early years of development are critical and are worthy of investment – the investment of providing the quality experiences that happen at Hilltop every day.

Hilltop Investments Moved to Socially Responsible Funds

Hilltop Investments Moved to Socially Responsible Funds

By Tamara Mount, November 7, 2014

The Hilltop board is pleased to announce that we have recently moved our investments into a socially responsible portfolio that will be managed by the local firm Prentiss Smith and Company.  They evaluate companies from a variety of perspectives including environmental impact, executive management transparency, demonstrated long term planning, and the societal benefits of their products and services.  This move now puts our investments in line with our mission and goals to be good stewards of the environment and the community. It comes at a time when we have completed current new building expenses and are now focussed on protecting and growing our “Campus Reserve Fund” to maintain our beautiful facilities. We will also be preparing for an “Endowment Fund” to help ensure continued financial aid for future students. An endowment will not only ensure economic diversity by supporting financial aid, but it also creates long term financial stability for the school. This move is something the board has been interested in doing for some time and we are pleased to now be in a position to make such investments.

Additional Words from Board Treasurer, Rich Wolfe

In response to being asked why he chose to serve on the board and how he views his role as treasurer, Rich said “As newcomers to the area and the Hilltop school community,  we were so pleased with the way Greta was welcomed into her new Middle School class, and the experience she was having with her teachers. Katy and I have had a long relationship with Montessori education (Katy also attended Montessori school and worked at the schools where our son, Robbie, was in programs from toddler – 8th grade) and we immediately recognized the quality of the program at Hilltop. We wanted to support the school in whatever way we could, and I think my role as treasurer is logical because I have worked in finance my whole life (starting when I was in middle school and my father gave me the responsibility of managing our household finances). My hope is that as treasurer I am able to communicate with the greater school community about Hilltop’s financial health and help plan for the school’s future.”

Annual Fund

By Tamara Mount, October 17, 2014

I was recently reminded, by a parent, about how long Hilltop has dreamed of having a Learning Specialist on staff to assist teachers and students. Wendy’s involvement with the children working hard to learn to read has indeed been a dream come true. We’ve also seen wonderful benefits, as a staff and community, to having Becky work as an assistant to Lower Elementary: helping with math, with transitions to activities, and providing a more age appropriate After Care for just the elementary age. We have also been thrilled to see Toddlers join our midst – everyone regularly stops to peek in at the little ones learning how to navigate their environment.

These new additions are some of the things that our fundraising and grant writing helps to make happen. These “extras” are wonderful benefits that cost more than what tuitions cover. We are thrilled to be able to provide these this year and look forward to further improvements. Please consider these investments in our staff and programs as we begin this year’s Annual Fund . . .

The Importance of Blending the Three Years within a Program

by Tamara Mount, Sept 12, 2014

One of the critical components of an authentic Montessori program is mixed age groups, usually three years in the same classroom. Hilltop has always had three years together for Children’s House, Lower Elementary and Upper Elementary. At times labels for the three years within each grouping have been used. To further blend the years, we are moving away from the using grade names and only occasionally using the “Younger”, “Middler”, and “Older” names. The more fully these three years are mixed, the greater the benefits. A few of the advantages of having the mixed ages are:

Older children solidify their learning and confidence when helping or teaching younger children, and younger often learn better from another child than from an adult.

Children can learn a skill or topic when they are developmentally interested, not at a predetermined time when students are “normally” learning that topic. All children of a set age do not need to be learning the same skill.

Children can take the time they need to work on a topic and then move to the next, whether that be longer or shorter than others, without being labeled “ahead”/”advanced”/”accelerated” or “slow”/”remedial”/”special”. A child with particular strength in one area can move more quickly through material, while a student who needs more practice on concepts can take more time. In doing this, they are just getting the “lessons” and doing the work that is right for them, no labels necessary.

Social diversity among ages gives more choices for friendships allowing for different levels of maturity and interests among ages. Students are not restricted artificially by chronological age but have a greater variety of friends to choose among.

In this type of environment, the distinctions of grade and the perception of someone being ahead or behind their grade don’t exist and students see each other, and themselves, more as individuals learning what they need to learn, able to help others in some topics and benefiting from others in another subject. Elementary age students might wonder at being in a math group with so many older children, or being in a reading group with younger children. In time, however, these perceptions break down and students see themselves and others engaging in material that is interesting and appropriate for them. They also begin to relish their roles as teachers themselves.

This mixed age grouping is not only for specific lessons, but also for the choices of follow-ups to the cultural/science lessons. For example, with the Lower Elementary class studying Nouns, there is one follow-up work to “label the environment”, another to list nouns that fit into categories (things that are “fuzzy”), and another work of identifying nouns in a “big book”, or classifying concrete and abstract nouns. If a child is really getting into nouns, they could do them all!

In conjunction with this academic and social mixing, we also have projects that are built into the traditions of each classroom, especially in the third year of each program. The “Olders” of Children’s House have pottery class in the winter; the “Olders” of Lower Elementary their biography and atlas projects, and the “Olders” of Upper El their Individual Study Project (ISPs). These traditions are important rite-of-passage and leadership opportunities at each program level.

We need partnership from parents to help reinforce the fact that people learn things at different times and paces at Hilltop Montessori School. Each child works on the lessons that they are ready for and interested in:

  • when your child wonders why they are in a math group with so-and-so, explain that the groupings are determined by who is ready for each lesson
  • when your child talks about a new friend, rather than asking what grade that child is in, ask what your child likes most about them, or what they talk about, etc. (For additional tips on questions to ask your children that get more conversation going than “How was your day at school?” check out this article.
  • if your child wants to be in a reading group that is doing chapter books, encourage her to read more with you at home to become a more fluent reader (it takes practice, not smarts)
  • if your child is asked what grade they are in by a friend or family member, please help them explain the three year groupings and use it as an opportunity to explain one of the many attributes of Montessori.